Congratulations to the 2021 Philosophy Department Prize Winners

June 25, 2021
Congratulations to the 2021 Philosophy Department Prize Winners

The Department of Philosophy is delighted to announce the winners of this year's Carrier, Adams, Bechtel, and Bowen Prizes, awarded annually to our undergraduate and graduate students for essays and theses/dissertations. You can read more about the history of these prizes below. Congratulations to all of these deserving undergraduate and graduate students!

 

Bechtel Prize:

Ian Martel for his essay, “The Problem of the Thing in Itself in Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason”

Adelle Goldenberg for her essay, “The ‘smothered’ self: the impact of testimonial smothering on trauma survivors”

 

 

Bowen Prize:

Rachel Achs for her essay, “In Defense of Guilt-Tripping”

Nikolas Kirk for his essay, “The Attention Economy, Civic Friendship, and Moral Understanding”

 

Carrier Prize:

Rachel Achs for her dissertation, “Self-Righteous Sentiment: On Blame and Its Norms”

Alexis Mealey for her senior thesis, “The Not-So-Innocent Threat: A Libertarian Justification for the Expansion of the Minimal State”

 

Adams Prize:

Thomas Pendlebury for his dissertation, “The Grounds of Sense: Kant's Image of Theoretical Finitude"

Margot Shang for her senior thesis, “Telling It As It Is: The Limitations and Potential of Astell’s Right to Education"

 

The Bechtel Prize in Philosophy was established through the generosity of Edwin D. Bechtel and is awarded annually for the best graduate and undergraduate essay on a philosophical subject.

 

The Francis Bowen Prize, established in 1938 by a bequest from Miss Maria Bowen as a memorial to her father who held the Alford professorship of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity from 1853 to 1889, is awarded annually for the best essay upon a subject in moral or political philosophy.

 

The Emily and Charles Carrier Prize was established in memory of Emily and Charles Carrier and is awarded to students submitting a thesis or dissertation on a subject in social, political, or moral philosophy.

 

The George Plimpton Adams Prize was established in 1974 in memory of Professor George Plimpton Adams and is awarded to students submitting a thesis or dissertation on a subject designated by the Department of Philosophy, preferably in the field of history of philosophy.

See also: Department News